Women's Rights in Afghanistan

Transcript

(Note: This transcript has been edited for readability.)

"When the Mujahideen came, all of a sudden, everything for women changed. Because they were more fundamental Muslims, and they [thought] that women [should not be] allowed to go outside a lot. But the Mujahideen time was not as bad as the Taliban time. They were still allowed to go to schools. They were still allowed to work. They were still allowed to only wear the headscarf, not the burqa. There were some limitations, but not as bad as during Taliban. Women were not allowed to go alone on the streets, they had to wear head-to-toe covering, and they were not allowed to go with any stranger. It had to be their husbands, or their brothers, or their uncles. They were not allowed to go even with their cousins. They had power over most of the cities in Afghanistan. In those cities, girls were not allowed to go to schools. There were actually no girls schools at all, so lots of things changed negatively for men, and especially for women during [the] Taliban time."

An Afghan national discusses women's rights in recent Afghan history.